Universal Design for Learning Modalities 

Individual and team research; and case study circles, portfolio development; survey style, lecture/recitation, discussion, OurFarms virtual supervised agriculture experiences (SAE); experiential learning/real-life work includes specialized knowledge and skills acquired outside of book/lecture learning situations.

Assessment, Evaluation

  • Performance-based demonstrations/presentations; weekly journaling and learning reflections; group/individual case study reports/predicament presentations; organic system planning and recordkeeping, , quizzes, and final portfolios, final examination
  • OurFARMS Case Study strategies (journaling, interviewing, group, and individual reflections; thoughtful thinking strategies and tactics. 

 

Lecture: survey/research presentation, combination of lecture, discussion, and case study methods individual and group research project, final project portfolio development

Lecture: survey/research presentation, combination of lecture, discussion, and case study methods individual and group research project, final project portfolio development

1) Organic History: Students presented with social, economic, and ecological consequences of the modern, industrial agriculture paradigm. Topics include history of agriculture, worldviews, the sustainability concept, organic agriculture systems, world food systems, and local food.

2) Five Steps to Organic Certification: Students will learn how organic farming differs from conventional, contrasting factors in a conventional vs. organic farm system operation. Students will gain an understanding of the parameters of USDA organic label.

3) Organic Overview/Organic System Plan: Introduction to sustainable and organic agriculture definitions, concepts, principles under the governance of USDA Agriculture Marketing Service, National Organic Program.

4) Prohibited, Allowed Substances: National List: Review of National List; recordkeeping requirements for documenting prevention of contamination, commingling, w/GMOs and prohibited substances.

5) Soil Fertility, Soil Health: Relationship between the USDA organic regulations and sustainable soil management. Role of organic agriculture in a sustainable food systems model. 

6) Organic Compost/Manure

Use of composted manures and plant materials in farming date to the earliest beginnings of agriculture. 

7) Organic Seeds (Crops Rotation, Cover Crops): Like other organic products, seeds used in organic agriculture can’t be genetically engineered or treated with prohibited substances.

8) Weeds Control and Diseases (§205.206): Weeds happen. Students will be introduced to a broad spectrum of important factors that comprise weed-control strategies.

9)  Crop pest, weed, disease management practice: History of pest management, including development of I-Pest-M strategies, tactics and how they are utilized in ecologically based pest management programs.  

10) Post Harvest Handling, Labeling, Commingling: The instant a crop is removed from the ground, or separated from its parent plant, it begins to deteriorate. Under organic production, growers harvest and market their produce at or near peak ripeness more commonly than in many conventional systems.

11) Recordkeeping: Required in certified operations, production, harvesting, post-harvest handling products; require full transparency in certified operation in what USDA defined as “in sufficient detail as to be readily understood and audited.” 

12) Food Safety and Good Agriculture Practices: Students will learn the purpose of GAPs is to give logical guidance in implementing best management practices that will help to reduce the risks of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables.

13) Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) Real World Experience: Gaining real life experience in regulated techniques, methods, standards in with emphasis on the Organic System Plan and record keeping, and other aspects of diversified farm management and maintenance

1) Organic History: Students presented with social, economic, and ecological consequences of the modern, industrial agriculture paradigm. Topics include history of agriculture, worldviews, the sustainability concept, organic agriculture systems, world food systems, and local food systems. 

2) Five Steps to Organic Certification

Students will learn how organic farming differs from conventional, contrasting factors in a conventional vs. organic farm system operation. Students will gain an understanding of the parameters of USDA organic label.

3) Organic Overview/Organic System Plan

Introduction to sustainable and organic agriculture definitions, concepts, principles under the governance of USDA Agriculture Marketing Service, National Organic Program 

4) Prohibited, Allowed Substances: National List

Review of National List; recordkeeping requirements for documenting prevention of contamination, commingling, w/GMOs and prohibited substances.

5) Soil Fertility, Soil Health: Relationship between the USDA organic regulations and sustainable soil management. Role of organic agriculture in a sustainable food systems model.

6) Organic Compost/Manure

Use of composted manures and plant materials in farming date to the earliest beginnings of agriculture. 

7) Organic Seeds (Crops Rotation, Cover Crops): Like other organic products, seeds used in organic agriculture can’t be genetically engineered or treated with prohibited substances.

8) Weeds Control and Diseases (§205.206): Weeds happen. Students will be introduced to a broad spectrum of important factors that comprise weed-control strategies.

9)  Crop pest, weed, disease management practice: History of pest management, including development of I-Pest-M strategies, tactics and how they are utilized in ecologically based pest management programs. 

10) Post Harvest Handling, Labeling, Commingling: The instant a crop is removed from the ground, or separated from its parent plant, it begins to deteriorate. Under organic production, growers harvest and market their produce at or near peak ripeness more commonly than in many conventional systems.

11) Recordkeeping: Required in certified operations, production, harvesting, post-harvest handling products; require full transparency in certified operation in what USDA defined as “in sufficient detail as to be readily understood and audited.” 

12) Food Safety and Good Agriculture Practices: Students will learn the purpose of GAPs is to give logical guidance in implementing best management practices that will help to reduce the risks of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables.

13) Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) Real World Experience: Gaining real life experience in regulated techniques, methods, standards in with emphasis on the Organic System Plan and record keeping, and other aspects of diversified farm management and maintenance.